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  1. What is meant by a casket flag?
    A casket (burial) flag is a 5' x 9.5' cotton United States flag. It is used on caskets of our service men and women if they either served at least one enlistment or if they served in any war. They must have had an honorable discharge.

    When draping a flag on a closed casket, the "Union" rests at the head and over the left shoulder of the body of the deceased.

    When a casket is displayed in the half-open position, the flag is folded in thirds with the outer fold displaying the "Union" next to the open portion of the casket on the deceased Veteran's left.

    When a casket is displayed fully open, the flag is folded into a triangle with only the stars and and blue of the "Union" showing. Then, it is placed in the center of the top portion of the casket lid just above the left shoulder of the deceased.

    According to the United States Flag Code, the burial flag should never be allowed to touch the ground, nor is it to be lowered into the ground with the casket.

    At the conclusion of the burial ceremony, the flag should be lifted waist-high by the pallbearers and held in this position for the playing of the "Taps". At the conclusion the flag should be folded in a triangle and presented to the deceased Veteran's next of kin.

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  2. What are military flag terms?
    GARRISON - A garrison flag is a large US Army flag that is flown on military posts on special days. It has a ratio of about 1:2, with measurements of 20 feet by 38 feet.

    STORM - A storm flag is a small US Army flag that is flown on military posts during storms. It has a ratio of about 1:2, with measurements of 5 feet by 9.5 feet.

    POST - A post flag is a large US Army flag that is ordinarily flown on military posts. It has a ratio of about 1:2, with measurements of 8 feet 11 3/8 inches by 17 feet.

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  3. How do I fold my flag?
    Folding the United States Flag

    Step 1


    To properly fold the Flag, begin by holding it waist-high with another person so that its surface is parallel to the ground.

    Step 2

    Fold the lower half of the stripe section lengthwise over the field of stars, holding the bottom and top edges securely

    Step 3

    Fold the flag again lengthwise with the blue field on the outside.

    Step 4

    Make a triangular fold by bringing the striped corner of the folded edge to meet the open (top) edge of the flag.

    Step 5

    Turn the outer (end) point inward, parallel to the open edge, to form a second triangle.

    Step 6

    The triangular folding is continued until the entire length of the flag is folded in this manner.

    Step 7

    When the flag is completely folded, only a triangular blue field of stars should be visible.

     

    Meaning of each flag fold

    The first fold of our flag is a symbol of life.

    The second fold is a symbol of our belief in the eternal life.

    The third fold is made in honor and remembrance of the Veteran departing our ranks who gave a portion of life for the defense of our country to attain a peace throughout the world.

    The fourth fold represents our weaker nature, for as American citizens trusting in God, it is to Him we turn in times of peace as well as in times of war for His divine guidance.

    The fifth fold is a tribute to our country, for in the words of Stephen Decatur, "Our country, in dealing with other countries, may she always be right; but it is still our country, right or wrong."

    The sixth fold is for where our hearts lie. It is with our heart that we pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America, and to the republic for which it stands, one nation, under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.

    The seventh fold is a tribute to our Armed Forces, for it is through the Armed Forces that we protect our country and our flag against all her enemies, whether they be found within or without the boundaries of our republic.

    The eighth fold is a tribute to the one who entered in to the valley of the shadow of death, that we might see the light of day, and to honor mother, for whom it flies on mother's day.

    The ninth fold is a tribute to womanhood; for it has been through their faith, love, loyalty and devotion that the character of the men and women who have made this country great have been molded.

    The tenth fold is a tribute to father, for he, too, has given his sons and daughters for the defense of our country since they were first born.

    The eleventh fold, in the eyes of a Hebrew citizen, represents the lower portion of the seal of King David and King Solomon, and glorifies, in their eyes, the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob.

    The twelfth fold, in the eyes of a Christian citizen, represents an emblem of eternity and glorifies, in their eyes, God the Father, the Son, and Holy Ghost.




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  4. Can I write on the flag I purchased?
    The flag should never have any mark, insignia, letter, work, figure, picture or drawing of any nature place upon or attached to a United States flag.

    Other flags for example solid color flags can be purchased and altered by the purchaser. There is no guarantee that what is used will not fade or run.

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  5. My flag touched the ground. Do I need to destroy the flag?
    Unfortunately, there are times when the flag accidentally touches the ground; however, this does not mean you have to destroy the flag. Simply take it off the ground as soon as you recognize what happened. If necessary, clean the flag before rehanging.

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  6. Is it proper to fly a flag that has been used on a casket?
    Since casket flags become the property of the Veteran's family, it is up to them how they want to honor their loved one. In most cases, they remain folded in a triangle and stored; however, there is no rule saying they cannot be flown in honor of their Veteran.

    It is not recommended that these flags fly continuously since they are cotton and only have two rows of stitching versus the usual four rows of stitching.

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  7. What is the difference between dye sublimation and appliqued?
    The design is fully sewn on an appliqued flag or banner.

    On a dye sublimation flag, the image is digitally printed on a flag or banner.

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  8. What is the difference between a banner and a flag?
    A flag is made with grommets on the header or a pole sleeve and flies horizontally on an in-ground pole outrigger style flagpole.

    Banners have a sleeve along the top and slide over a pole to hang vertically. These are designed to hang on a pole perpendicular to a building or on a wall.

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  9. Does the flag have a warranty or guarantee?
    We guarantee that every flag we sell is free from manufacturer's defects for a period of thirty days from receipt of the flag. Unfortunately, we cannot provide longer a warranty because the life of a flag depends upon the conditions under which a flag is flown.

    To get the most wear out of your flag, we offer the following suggestions and cautions.

    All OUTDOOR FLAGS are designed to fly in the wind; however, high winds especially accompanied by rain will cause damage to the flag. TAKE THE FLAG DOWN DURING STORMS WHENEVER POSSIBLE.
    Keep the flag from fraying or tearing by looking at the fly end of the flag for any signs of wear. If wear appears, the worn part should be cut off and the flag re-hemmed.
    A clean flag will last longer. Pollutants in the air will get into the fabric and can cause it to degrade. To clean, wash in a mild detergent, rinse, and hang to dry. KEEP YOUR FLAG AWAY FROM PETROLEUM AND CHEMICAL PRODUCTS.
    Never fold or store a flag when it is wet. Let it hang dry completely before you put it away. Wet flags will mildew and ruin the material.

    INDOOR & PARADE FLAGS are damaged mainly due to neglect. If the flag is soiled in any way, it should be DRY CLEANED, NOT WASHED.
    If an indoor flag becomes wet, it should hang to dry completely before is it stored.
    If possible, avoid exposure to direct sunlight for long periods of time.

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  10. Do the flags come with grommets or do you buy them separately?
    Grommets are metal rings that are punched into the header of the flag. Clips can then be attached to fly the flag from your halyard or pole. If you need your flags adjusted to your personal needs additional grommets can be purchased.

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  11. What size flag should I buy?
    There is general rule for the appropriate size flag for a given pole. If you wish to display your flag upon a wall please measure the desired wall space before placing your order. Also, flags with fringe will not hang correctly on a wall, instead we recommend the outdoor flag with header and grommets.

    GUIDELINES FOR PURCHASING OUTDOOR FLAGS

    Flag Proper - Location for Display
    12" x 18" - Boat
    2' x 3' - House mounted flagpole
    2 1/2' x 4' - House mounted flagpole
    3' x 5' - House mounted or 20' flagpole
    4' x 6' - 25' flagpole
    5' x 8' - 30' flagpole
    6' x 10' - 35' flagpole
    8' x 12' - 40' flagpole
    8' x 12' - 45' flagpole
    10' x 15' - 50' flagpole
    12' x 18' - 60' flagpole
    15' x 25' - 70' flagpole
    20' x 30' - 80' flagpole

    GUIDELINES FOR PURCHASING INDOOR FLAGS

    Flag - Proper Pole Size
    2' x 3' - 6'
    2 1/2' x 4' - 6'
    3' x 5' - 7' or 8'
    4' x 6' - 9'
    5' x 8' - 12'

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  12. Where are our flags made?
    All of our Flags are made in the United States except for the following-

     
    • Most decorative banners
       
    • All of our dog and cat banners.


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  13. Glossary of Terms
    Battle - A battle flag is a flag that is carried by the armed forces on land.

    Border - A bordered flag has a distinct border around the entire flag, like that of the Maldives.

    Burgee - A burgee is a long, tapered flag or pennant that ends in a swallowtail (having two points, like that of a swallow\'s tail). Burgees are often used by sailing clubs.

    Canton - The canton is the upper area of the flag by the flagstaff, or a flag with a design featured in the canton area, like the flag of Taiwan, above. Sometimes, the word canton refers to any of the four quarters of a flag.

    Charge - The charge is the emblem or design featured on a flag. For example, the 5 pointed star on the Morocco flag,

    Chief - The chief is the top third of the shield of a coat-of-arms.

    Civil - A civil flag is a national flag that is displayed on land by private citizens.

    Courtesy - When a ship enters a port, it often flies the national flag of the country it is visiting as a courtesy - this is a courtesy flag.

    Defacing - Defacing (which is not vandalizing) is when a flag is altered by adding writing, another emblem, and so on.

    Ensign - An ensign is a flag that is flown at the back (stern) of a ship noting its nationality. For many countries, the ensign is not the same as the national flag; some countries have a multitude of ensigns, designed for different types of vessels.

    Field - The field is the background color of the flag. The only national flag that is a simple field without any designs is the flag of Libya.

    Finial - A finial is a decorative element at the top of a flagpole.

    Fly - The fly is the part of the flag that is farthest from the flagstaff.

    Halyard - A halyard is the rope that is used to raise (hoist) and lower a flag on a flagstaff.

    Hoist - The hoist is the vertical measurement of a flag (the height, or the length that runs along the flagpole).

    Jack - A jack is a flag that is flown at the front (bow) of a ship.

    Pennant - A pennant is a small, long, tapering or triangular flag.

    Ratio - The ratio of a flag is its proportions, the height divided by the width. The ratio of a flag\'s dimensions are usually reported as something like 2:3, which would mean that the height is 2/3 of the width, or 1:2, which would mean that the height is half the width.

    Shield - The shield is the main part of a coat-of-arms, and is shaped like a shield of armor.

    Signal - Signal flags are flags that stand for letters and numbers (forming coded messages). They are used to communicate between ships at sea.

    Streamer - A streamer is a long, thin flag.

    Swallowtail - A swallowtail is a type of flag or pennant that ends in two (or more) points, like the tail of a swallow.

    Union - The blue field with stars in the upper left corner of the United States flag.

    Vexillology - Vexillology is the study of flags.

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  14. What is the meaning of each flag fold?
    The first fold of our flag is a symbol of life.

    The second fold is a symbol of our belief in the eternal life.

    The third fold is made in honor and remembrance of the Veteran departing our ranks who gave a portion of life for the defense of our country to attain a peace throughout the world.

    The fourth fold represents our weaker nature, for as American citizens trusting in God, it is to Him we turn in times of peace as well as in times of war for His divine guidance.

    The fifth fold is a tribute to our country, for in the words of Stephen Decatur, "Our country, in dealing with other countries, may she always be right; but it is still our country, right or wrong."

    The sixth fold is for where our hearts lie. It is with our heart that we pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America, and to the republic for which it stands, one nation, under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.

    The seventh fold is a tribute to our Armed Forces, for it is through the Armed Forces that we protect our country and our flag against all her enemies, whether they be found within or without the boundaries of our republic.

    The eighth fold is a tribute to the one who entered in to the valley of the shadow of death, that we might see the light of day, and to honor mother, for whom it flies on mother's day.

    The ninth fold is a tribute to womanhood; for it has been through their faith, love, loyalty and devotion that the character of the men and women who have made this country great have been molded.

    The tenth fold is a tribute to father, for he, too, has given his sons and daughters for the defense of our country since they were first born.

    The eleventh fold, in the eyes of a Hebrew citizen, represents the lower portion of the seal of King David and King Solomon, and glorifies, in their eyes, the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob.

    The twelfth fold, in the eyes of a Christian citizen, represents an emblem of eternity and glorifies, in their eyes, God the Father, the Son, and Holy Ghost.



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  15. What is the origin of the American Flag?

    The exact origin of the first United States flag is in question, but some historians believe it was designed by Congressman Francis Hopkinson and sewn by Philadelphia seamstress Betsy Ross. It was on June 14, 1777 that the Continental Congress passed an Act to establish guidelines for the American flag. They resolved that "the flag of the United States be made of thirteen stripes, alternate red and white; that the union be thirteen stars, white in a blue field, representing a new constellation." It wasn't until August 3, 1949, that President Truman commemorated the occasion by officially declaring June 14th as Flag Day. Between 1777 and 1960, Congress passed several acts that changed the shape, design and arrangement of the flag and allowed for additional stars to be added to reflect the admission of each new state.

    An Act of January 13, 1794 provided for 15 stars and 15 stripes after May, 1795. This flag was known as the Star Spangled Banner flag.

    An Act of April 4, 1818 signed by President Monroe , provided for 13 stripes and one star for each state, to be added to the flag on July 4th following the admission of each new state.

    President Taft signed an executive order on June 24, 1912 establishing proportions of the flag and provided for arrangement of the stars in six horizontal rows of eight each and a single point of each star to be upward.

    On two occasions, President Eisenhower provided for star arrangements on the American flag. On January 3, 1959, the stars were to be in seven rows of seven stars each, staggered horizontally and vertically. Then on August 21, 1959 he planned nine rows of stars staggered horizontally and eleven rows of stars staggered vertically.

    Today the flag consists of thirteen horizontal stripes, seven red alternating with 6 white. The stripes represent the original 13 colonies, the stars represent the 50 states of the Union. The colors of the flag are symbolic as well; red symbolizes hardiness and valor; white symbolizes purity and innocence and blue represents vigilance, perseverance and justice.

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  • Sunday, November 23, 2014